Level 4 Diploma in Health, Diet and Nutrition

 

Level 4 Diploma in Health, Diet and Nutrition Accredited

Level 4 Diploma in Health, Diet and Nutritional Studies CIE_Logo

Health, Diet and Nutrition are essential aspects of life. This internationally recognized qualification, can equip you with the knowledge and skills required to pursue a career within this rapidly growing industry. This course specially selected units which confer both transferable skills and essential knowledge. Whether students are looking to further their knowledge or move onto a new career path, this qualification is invaluable. Upon completion, students are eligible to register for membership with the Complimentary Medical Association.Level 4 Diploma in Health, Diet and Nutrition

 

Award: Level 4 Diploma in Health, Diet and Nutritional Studies

 

At the end of this course successful learners will receive an accredited certificate from the CIE and a Learner Unit Summary (which lists the details of all the units the learner has completed as part of the course).

The course has been accredited by CIE . This means that Oxford Learning College has undergone an external quality check to ensure that the organisation and the courses it offers, meet certain quality criteria. The completion of this course alone does not lead to an Ofqual regulated qualification but may be used as evidence of knowledge and skills towards regulated qualifications in the future.

The unit summary can be used as evidence towards Recognition of Prior Learning if you wish to progress your studies in this sector. To this end the learning outcomes of the course have been benchmarked at Level 3 against level descriptors published by Ofqual, to indicate the depth of study and level of demand/complexity involved in successful completion by the learner.

The course itself has been designed by Oxford Learning College to meet specific learners’ and/or employers’ requirements which cannot be satisfied through current regulated qualifications. ABC Awards endorsement involves robust and rigorous quality audits by external auditors to ensure quality is continually met. A review of courses is carried out as part of the endorsement process.

 

Syllabus and Unit Specification:

Unit 1: Using ICT in Health, Diet and Nutritional Studies

Information, communication and technology (ICT) comprises core skills for learning. In this distance learning course utilisation of methods, tools and strategies of ICT is important in order to establish and maintain a sound working relationship with tutors and the college. Students will need to develop ICT skills in order to communicate effectively and maximise their study progression.

The first unit of this course in Health, Diet and Nutritional Studies course explains how to set up an ePortfolio which students will use during the lifetime of the course for storage of all their files including coursework, self-assessment activities, independent research notes and reflective journals. The ePortfolio may be requested from time to time by tutors and moderators. Students will be asked at various points in the course to upload files for this purpose. The ePortfolio will not only provide students with a structured system of unique information but once completed can be used as a resource for continuing professional development (CPD), and a body of revision for future studies.

Independent research is fundamental to level 5 study and also equips students with confidence to source and evaluate information relevant to the core course topics. In this first unit students are presented with tools and strategies with which to begin to undertake independent research and integrate this into coursework activities, for example suggesting ways to read research articles and assimilate types of information from these.

The development of knowledge and understanding through writing skills is important for communicating ideas and arguments to tutors and other readers of written work. Therefore this unit reviews writing skills, and incorporates reflective writing into both the course and coursework activities. Reflective writing is a way that individuals can review their own approaches to learning and communication; and it also promotes pro-active implementation of skills enhancement through tutor feedback and self-assessment.

Unit 2: Understanding health and wellbeing

There are many influencing factors which contribute to an individual’s perceived or actual state of health. Within this section we will explore some of the key factors. The social sciences are usually concerned with the study of human patterns of behaviour, activities and experiences of groups and communities and how those groups are organized into societies . The aspects of the social sciences that we should be concerned with in our studies and relevant to those working within health fields are: lifestyle choices and activities that people choose and that affect their wellbeing, this is also related to ethnicity, gender and social class. In addition the individuals’ personal development within their social group and community will affect their experiences, so this is a key factor as well.

The biological aspects involve understanding how the body works, health and disease and lifestyle; all these being related to what sort of care requirements they may need or seek.

Psychological aspects are concerned with the human mind, including thoughts and emotions that may influence actions, behaviours, and again, lifestyle choices. The following diagram shows how some of the social aspects of individuals are classified in groups. Many of these overlap and are certainly related to each other. All these factors are explored in the unit and relevant theories, models and legislation discussed

The quality of diet in general has deteriorated in recent years and more people are consuming highly processed foods, together with convenience meals in growing quantities. In addition the consumption of high sugar drinks and low fibre content foods is adding to the obesity problem amongst the general population. Portion size is becoming an increasing problem and contributing factor to obesity and the predisposition to chronic disease associated with being overweight such as coronary heart disease and Type II diabetes. Obesity also contributes to other serious health problems such as specific cancers, osteoarthritis, asthma, low back pain, sleep apnoea (not being able to breathe normally when asleep), fertility problems and a whole host of other conditions. This unit will explore factors which may affect diet such as socio-economic, demographic and ethnicity influences

Physical inactivity is known to contribute, not only to obesity but also to the risk of developing high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, colon cancer, Type II diabetes, stress, anxiety states and depression. Exercise is also fundamental in maintaining health bones and in the prevention of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis in later life. This unit discusses many of the conditions related to inactivity as a risk factor

Smoking remains the single largest cause of preventable disease in the UK and is bereft of any healthy benefits; in fact it predisposes to development of cardiovascular disease and lung cancer because of the intake of carbon monoxide, nicotine and tar. Alcohol and drug use is a part of normal social life to some people, however taken in excess they will almost certainly result in detrimental health effects. Binge drinking is becoming a significant problem in modern life and impacts health and social care services to disproportionate levels. These three key addictions are briefly discussed and associated issues of health and wellbeing explored.

Unit 3: Understanding disease processes

Defining health is a difficult and subjective issue; it could simply be an absence of disease or disease symptoms, to other individuals it may be a snapshot of how they feel at any given time and may even be when diagnosed disease exists. Disease likewise is just as difficult to define but in 2003 the World Health Organization introduced the 10 th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) which is a framework for disease categorization and statistical reference. Each disease is coded and grouped in one of 4 sub-categories. Another more simplistic way of categorization is to describe diseases as being physical, mental or social. In this unit we look at the classification of disease

Diagnosis is normally done by assessing the signs, symptoms and clinical features that a person presents with and that fits the ‘normal’ aetiology or pattern of that particular disease. Early diagnosis is the most effective weapon against disease and the spread of disease. There are many common diagnostic processes, tests and procedures. This unit presents examples of common diagnostic tests and procedures

Gathering data is an importance process in the field of public health as it not only provides a snapshot in time of current health status of populations and communities but also identifies trends and potential problems. This section of the unit looks at how data are gathered and evaluated. It also explores the applications of this gathered data and how the outcomes might influence health and wellbeing

When people experience ill health, many of these facets are linked and therefore it important that they are treated holistically rather than concentrating on a set of symptoms. The medical model is seen as a rather negative approach but has remained a powerful view in society, probably due to its link to pathology of disease and ‘scientific’ basis. The holistic approach or view takes into account all aspects of an individual’s life and therefore can give a more definitive view of someone’s state of health. For example a person with a controlled disease or disability may consider themselves to be healthy; but according to the medical model of health status measurement, they would not be. The unit looks at the different models of health and disease.

 

Unit 4: Promoting health

Health promotion is a collaborative process; as well as involvement by public health departments, the NHS and local provisions; there are many ways in which individuals can take responsibility for improving their own health and maintaining a positive status. This module examines the provisions and ways in which individuals can take this responsibility

Health promotion is delivered through a number of routes which can be formal or informal, for example we may attend a support group or take part in an organized campaign, or alternatively we may exchange or impart health education within and between family members. There is however, a great deal of collaboration between the different organizations and agencies who deliver health promotion in a formal way. Different health promotion models are examined and evaluated

As discussed previously in the course material, research is important in order to predict and establish trends, possible outcomes and health needs relevant to care service provision and disease control. In order to move or progress practice in health care forward, research based evidence in strategic areas is needed. High standards are expected when research is carried out which involves patients and members of the public, therefore research governance are a collection of crucial processes to ensure that these standards are met. They include: ethical approval, research and development approval, evidence of informed consent and where clinical interventions are taking place, evidence of appropriate safety procedures.

Psychology aims to help us understand and explain how individuals think, feel and behave. In many care settings you are trying to effect behaviour change of some sort, therefore it is important to have a basic understanding of behavioural concepts and psychological approaches that can be employed to help this process. This section explores the psychology of health, associated theories and concepts.

Unit 5: Anatomy and physiology in health and disease part 1

In each of these following units, example illnesses and conditions will be presented and discussed alongside the core course material

The body’s internal environment is rigidly controlled and this state needs to remain as constant as possible within certain ranges. The process of homeostasis is controlled by sophisticated mechanisms which are sensitive to changes that affect the body’s internal environment, and they respond accordingly. This section will concentrate on homeostasis and look at feedback mechanisms

Blood consists of 55% plasma, and 45% cells. It accounts for approximately 7% of total body weight, or about 5.6 litres in an average 70kg (11 stone) man. Blood is a connective tissue, and a communication medium between the body and the external environment. Haemoglobin is a large protein containing a globular protein called globin and a pigmented iron complex called haem. Each haemoglobin molecule consists of four globin chains, four haem units with one iron atom attached to each. The iron atoms can combine with oxygen which means that each haemoglobin molecule has the capacity to carry 4 oxygen molecules. In turn there are approximately 280 million haemoglobin molecules in each red blood cell. The haemoglobin molecule is said to be saturated when all iron atoms or binding sites are full and it therefore becomes oxyhaemoglobin. With the increased oxygen content the colour of blood becomes bright red, conversely blood low in oxygen content is a blue colour (unsaturated). Oxygen is easily release from red blood cells when required. This section of the unit concentrates on the constituent parts of blood and discusses how oxygen is distributed throughout the body.

The cardiovascular system and conduction are fundamental to homeostatic maintenance. This section presents detailed anatomy and physiology. We will also look at: the cardiac cycle, cardiac output and blood pressure. In conjunction with the cardiovascular system we examine and discuss the respiratory system which is concerned with the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the blood and the lungs; this is essential for the provision of energy for cellular metabolic function. Most of this energy extraction which is derived from chemical reactions can only take place in the presence of oxygen, and the route of oxygen intake is via the respiratory system.

Next the unit moves onto the musculoskeletal system and the composition of bone, structure and function of muscles, tendons and joints. We look at movement and the skeletal relationship to other systems

The section will also look in detail at the central nervous system which detects and responds to internal and external environmental changes in, and out on the body. Finally in this section we examine the digestive system and processes, and link all the systems by homeostatic role.

Unit 6: Anatomy and physiology in health and disease part 2

The endocrine system consists of several unconnected glands. These glands contain groups of secretory cells which are surrounded by dense networks of capillaries, allowing the diffusion of the hormonesthey produce, into the bloodstream. Hormones are chemical messengers which target specific organs and tissues in the body, influencing growth and metabolism. Although the endocrine system, which is under the control of the ANS is partially responsible for homeostatic maintenance, its main role is control of precise and slow changes of this state.

The skin is the largest organ of the body. It completely covers the body, and is continuous with all the linings, membranes and orifices. The skin protects underlying structures and organs from injury, and the invasion of foreign material and microbes

In almost every cell of the human body the nucleus contains and identical copy of the individual’s genetic material (apart from red blood cells and gametes or sex cells). Chromosomes carry genes along their length and each gene contains coded information which allows the cell to produce a specific protein. Each gene codes for one protein. Genes consist of long, tightly wrapped strands of DNA, totally in excess of one metre in each cell. DNA is a double stranded molecule consisting of two chains of nucleotides, which in turn each consist of a sugar, a phosphate group and a base. Most cells within the human body are capable of division by mitosis which produces identical diploid or daughter cells; these are essential for normal growth and repair. The production of the gametes or sex cells is different because of the chromosome number and role that they play in gender differentiation.

The reproductive system is one of the things that sets living things apart from nonliving things. It is not essential when it comes to keeping the living alive, but is essential in keeping the species alive. It is the process by which organisms produce more organisms like themselves. Both the male and female reproductive systems are essential when creating a new organism, and are very much alike in their qualities

The urinary system has key roles in thermo and fluid regulation as well as filtration and control of specific hormones and substances. This unit will look in detail at these and link the processes to homeostatic maintenance

The special senses link many of the systems and processes, and bring the external environment into homeostasis. These systems and processes will be examined.

Unit 7: Body chemistry and organisation

The atom is the smallest part of a known element that exists in a stable form. Atoms are largely spaces which contain protons and neutrons with electrons continually orbiting them. Neutrons do not carry any electrical charge but protons are positively charged and electrons negatively charged. Atoms contain protons and electrons in equal numbers so therefore have no net charge to them. Where these particles differ is their mass which is measured in atomic mass units; a proton has 1 mass unit with 1 positive electric charge, a neutron has 1 mass unit with neutral charge, and an electron has a very small (almost immeasurable) mass with 1 negative electrical charge.

In addition to this, each element or substance that contains only one type of atom differs from each other by the number of protons it contains in its atomic nuclei. Examples of elements are hydrogen, oxygen and sodium. We need to have a basic understanding of atoms as their configuration and behaviour produce molecules required for biological diversity.

This section of the unit looks at molecules essential to life The unit presents and discusses structure and function of these molecules and includes discussion about balance and role in homeostasis

Efficient cellular function is essential to maintaining normal of function. This section covers cell structure, function and discusses how cellular transport occurs, and what can go wrong when this is interrupted or prevented from occurring.

Unit 8: Pathology, immunology and epidemiology

Pathology is literally translated as the study of suffering and it links clinical science with clinical practice, combining investigation of the causes of disease (etiology) and the underlying mechanisms which result in presentation of signs and symptoms (pathogenesis).

In pathology there are many strategies which are employed in order to understand the changes that occur in cells, tissues and organs; these are: molecular, microbiologic and immunologic. The pathology will help to guide diagnosis and therapy through the identification of microscopic changes in cells, tissues and body fluids (morphology).

Therefore the basis of pathological science is the behaviour of cells and because cells are active participants in their environment, they are sensitive to changes and adjust their structure and function accordingly in order to maintain homeostasis.

Immunity can be described as a bodily state of protection against disease through the activities of the immune system. The immune system is a collection of cells and proteins that protect the body from harmful micro organisms. In this unit we look at different types of immunity

Bacteria and viruses attack the body systems in different ways. In this section we build on knowledge and understanding of pathology and immunology and discuss how diseases are prevented and what kinds of deficiencies in the body might cause these diseases.

 About the Provider

Oxford Learning is a registered educational institution and is an independent, self-financing organisation. Oxford Learning has developed quality, flexible and open distance learning materials for adults and continues to invest in the development of innovative learning systems, from first levels to degree and professional training programmes.

Oxford Learning works in conjunction with other institutions to bring the student the most comprehensive learning materials in order to support the student in fulfilling their academic aims.oxford college courses

Oxford Learning offers the student a flexible approach to learning which makes education possible for those who may otherwise not be able to complete a programme due to geographical restrictions and work or home-life commitments

Course Fee

£2,800.00

Level 4 Accredited Diploma in Health, Diet and Nutrition

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