English Degree

English Degree

Do you want to study English at degree level? Our selection of the best A Level combinations

will help you to meet the requirements of top ranked Universities.

  • A Level English Literature
  • A Level History
  • A Level Sociology

 

A Level English Literature

The AS Units

Unit 1: Texts in Contex

Unit 1 is worth 30% of the A-level (or 60% if student chooses to complete AS only).

Assessment is by written examination in May/ June of year of study.  The examination lasts 2 hours.

The written examination is in two sections.

In Section A, you will be analysing an unprepared and unseen extract. Extracts will be analysed in the context of the wider reading done in preparation for the examination. This question is worth 45 marks and should take 15 minutes of reading and planning, and 45 minutes of writing time.

In Section B, you will produce an essay in response to a given viewpoint on the ‘core’ poetry text that you have studied. You will be expected to consider various perspectives in your argument. This question is worth 45 marks and should take 15 minutes of reading and planning, and 45 minutes of writing time.

Students will need to bring a clean copy of the set poetry text into the examination:

Your course materials will help you learn how to examine aspects of spoken and written language.

Unit 2: Creative Study World War One Literature

This unit carries 20% of the total marks (or 40% if the student chooses to complete AS only).

Assessment is by coursework portfolio. This is completed throughout the year and submitted to your examination centre in April so marks can be awarded.

You will produce two essays demonstrating prior in-depth study of one novel and one drama text from the same period.  The pieces you write will be based on your own thematic study of texts which can be categorised as source texts and literary criticism on the subject of World War One.

Wider reading will be used to support you in producing one text for a reading audience, one text for a listening audience and evaluative commentaries of your own writing.

Word limits are as follows:

  • 2500 words maximum for the portfolio (TWO essays approximately 1000-1250 words each)

You will be asked to provide a creative response to each of your texts and the assessment will look at individual interpretation. The aim of the unit is to encourage and foster a working knowledge of creative approaches to literary criticism.

As a distance learner, the learning materials will provide some model examples of suitable texts to choose. If you wish to use an additional text of your choice, your tutor will be able to advise you on its suitability.

The course materials for Unit 2 are designed to support you in the writing process as you plan, draft and write your own texts.

The A2 Units

Important note: A2 is not a standalone qualification. You need to have taken units 1 and 2 with Units 3 and 4 to achieve the full A-level.

 Unit 3 ‘Love Through the Ages’

This unit requires you to consider the ways in which writers have presented the central theme of love in one poetry, one prose and one drama text. The title of the unit indicates the requirement for students to read across historical and literary periods , from Chaucer’s middle English in the fourteenth century, to multimodal texts of the present day. Love can be considered in a number of forms – from platonic,  to romantic, to the love created by family bonds. The examination will give you opportunities to present comparative skills, as you compare and contrast a broad range of texts.

Unit 3 is worth 30% of the A-level.

Assessment is by written examination in May/ June of year of study.  The examination lasts 2 hours and 30 minutes.

As in Unit 1, you will answer TWO questions.

In Section A, you will be analysing TWO  unprepared extracts linked by genre. These unseen extracts will be provided in a source booklet given to you in the examination. You will compare how the theme of love is presented in these texts.

In Section B, you will respond to TWO further unseen extracts. You will be expected to make connections and comparisons across texts, with an awareness of wider contexts drawn from your wider reading.

 

Unit 4: Extended Essay and Shakespeare Study

This unit carries 20% of the total marks for the A Level.

Assessment is by coursework portfolio. This is completed throughout the year and submitted to your examination centre in April so marks can be awarded.  A maximum of 70 marks will be awarded.

The portfolio will consist of one piece of extended writing. It will focus on a Shakespearean text and you will produce a comparative study with the core text against two other texts. In the study, you will be required to explore themes, language, form and style. At A2, you will be expected to consider a range of possible literary interpretations of all three texts.

Wider reading of critical texts and an awareness of the critical history of each of your chosen texts will be used to support you in producing the study.

Word limits are as follows:

  • 3000 words maximum for the comparative essay.

The piece you write will be based on your own thematic study of texts and topic-based research. At A2 you will be given a choice of texts to work from. Your wider reading should be made up of the study of one Shakespearean text, two comparative texts and further research using a range of texts.

The course materials for Unit 4 are designed to support you in the writing process as you plan, draft and write your own texts.

Additional resources – What else will I need?

Course texts

Unit 1 LITA1

  • Barker, Pat  Regeneration (Penguin, 2008 [1991])
  • Gardner, Brian (ed.) Up the Line to Death: The War Poets 1914-1918 (Methuen, 2007 [1964])
  • Reilly, Catherine (ed.) Scars Upon My Heart:  Women’s Poetry and Verse of the First World War (Virago, 1981)

Unit 2 LITA2

  • Faulks, Sebastian  Birdsong (Vintage, 1994)
  • Sherriff, R.C.  Journey’s End (Penguin Classics, 2000 [1929])

Unit 3 LITA3

  • Barnes, Julian Talking it Over (Picador, 1991)
  • Chaucer, Geoffrey  The Canterbury Tales trans. Nigel Coghill (Penguin, 2003 [1951])
  • Shakespeare, William Twelfth Night, or, What You Will (ca. 1601)

The AQA syllabus does not prescribe particular texts for wider reading for this unit. Students are encouraged to determine their own private study texts, related to the topic of’ Love through the Ages’. Because the A2 focuses strongly on individual interpretation, the choice of wider reading will not be restricted to a list.

Qualification

The titles of the qualifications as will appear on certificates are:

AQA GCE A Level English Literature

Both AS and A2 level courses and examinations must be successfully completed to gain a full A level.

Specification:  AQA NAEL (2740)

 

A Level History

The AS Units

Unit 1: Historical Themes in Breadth

In this unit you will examine issues of power, influence and control in the societies of the USA and Russia (USSR) in the 20th century. Both studies will help you to investigate the politics, values and beliefs of these diametrically opposed countries.

The materials will allow you to reflect upon the operation of power and the forces for change in

power relationships in these very different societies at different times during the 20th Century.

Option D: A World Divided: Communism and Democracy in the 20th Century

  • D4 Stalin’s Russia, 1924-53
  • D7 Politics, Presidency and Society in the USA, 1968-2001

Stalin’s Russia, 1924-53

This unit focuses on the dramatic and traumatic years of Soviet history under the leadership of Joseph Stalin. Studying this unit will enable you to demonstrate your understanding of the following aspects of Stalin’s Russia;

  • The struggle for power between Trotsky, Zinoviev, Kamenev, Bukharin and Stalin in the five years following the death of Lenin.
  • The continuation of policies such as NEP and the different policies of ‘socialism in one country’ as opposed to ‘world revolution’.
  • The influence of personalities and the developing political institutions of the new Soviet Union upto 1929.
  • The important changes in social and economic policies between 1928 and 1941 including collectivisation and its effects not just on rural areas but its connection to industrialisation and urbanisation.
  • The changing nature and priorities of the three five-year plans and the successes and failures of these plans as well as changes to state policies on education, family and divorce.
  • Totalitarian features of the regime including the secret police under Yagoda, Yezhov and Beria and the impact of the secret police on politics and society.
  • The development of the ‘cult of personality’ and the concept of ‘social realism’ in the arts and culture.
  • The USSR’s survival and triumph in the Second World War. Please note that the Examination Board will not set detailed questions will not be set on particular campaigns or the conflict of the Second World War, or on relations with other powers after 1945.

Politics, Presidency and Society in the USA, 1968-2001

The unit focuses on the domestic history of the United States in the last third of the 20th century. In this unit you will investigate the social, political and economic issues. You will not investigate US foreign policy except in terms of its domestic impact.

Studying this unit will enable you to demonstrate your understanding of the following aspects of the USA;

  • The political developments surrounding the presidency and affecting the power of the office of the President in this period.
  • Why Nixon’s was victorious in winning the elections of 1968 and 1972.
  • Watergate as an important constitutional issue and the reasons for Nixon’s resignation in 1974.
  • The reasons why Carter was elected in 1976 but lost to Reagan in 1980.
  •  Why Reagan achieved such popularity, winning a second term by a large margin in 1984 and why Clinton was so popular.
  • The social issues of the period and their impact on politics.
  • Why issues of feminism, religious belief, abortion and gay rights achieved such political importance. As well as the continuing issue of race and race relations, why the Supreme court became such a battleground for these issues.
  • The influence of US popular culture and the importance of film, TV and radio on society and politics as well as the impact of celebrities and sports heroes on culture, especially  in race relations.
  • The economic policies and the correct role of the state, including the reaction to enhanced federal spending that developed in the 1970s, and the new emphasis on the virtues of lower taxes and expanding the free market.
  • The congressional resistance to Democrat party initiatives under President Clinton.

Unit 2: Historical Themes in Depth: Option E: Britain in the Later 20th Century: Responding to Change

E1 British Political History, 1945-90: Consensus and Conflict

In this unit you will examine the key issues which challenged Labour and Conservative governments in the period 1945-90 and analyse the differences and similarities in which they attempted to deal with these key issues.

Whilst you are not expected to have detailed knowledge of the composition of governments, you will develop an understanding of the key features of the policies and achievements of government in this period.  This is primarily done through an appreciation and analysis of source material.

Studying this unit will enable you to develop your understanding of the following aspects of British political history;

  • The roles and importance as prime ministers of Clement Attlee, Harold Macmillan, Harold Wilson, Edward Heath, James Callaghan and Margaret Thatcher.
  • How foreign policy crises impacted on the two main political parties over the Suez crisis in 1956-7 and over Britain’s involvement with the European Economic Community (including the EU) in the years 1957-90.
  • The themes of welfare, housing, education and the handling of the economy can be traced throughout the period 1945-90.
  • The period of post-war construction under the Labour governments of 1945-51. Including why the Labour victory in 1945 was so comprehensive.
  • The importance in this period of the Beveridge plan of 1942.
  • The origins of the National Health Service, nationalisation, the implementation of the Butler Education Act (1944) and policies designed to reduce social inequality in Britain.
  • ‘An age of austerity’: food rationing and the limited opportunities for leisure and expenditure experienced by most British citizens in the years immediately following the end of the war.
  • The period of Conservative governments and extent of continuity with Labour policy and objectives.
  • The impact of Labour and Conservative policies implemented during this period and the failure and success of their policies to reduce social inequality.
  • The key features domestic policy by Conservative governments between 1951- 64.
  • The rise in living standards in comparison with the immediate post-war period and be able to account for this difference.
  • Consider whether Britain ‘never had it so good’ in the 1950s? And why did situation appear less rosy by the mid-1960s?
  • The growing problems of Labour and Conservative governments in the period 1964-79. Particularly in relation to the health service, education, inflation, wages policy and relations with trades unions.
  • Changes of government and periods of time when the government of the day had either a very small majority or no overall majority.
  • Margaret Thatcher’s period as prime minister from 1979-1990. Why did the Conservatives win the general election of 1979?
  • Reforms to the NHS, education and economic policies of the 1980s and why these were controversial, both within and outside the Conservative party.
  • The Miners’ Strike of 1984-5 and the introduction of the Community Charge; and rivalries within the party in the 1980s and the fall of Thatcher from power in 1990.

The A2 Units

Unit 3: Depth Studies and Associated Historical Controversies. Option E: War and Peace: 20th Century International Relations

Option E2: A World Divided: Superpower Relations, 1944-1990

The focus of this unit is on the international relations in the late 20th

Century, chiefly between the two superpowers that emerged after the Second World War; the USA and the USSR, and the creation of a ‘bi-polar’ world.

  • The continuation of the Cold War in the 1950s following the retirement of Truman and the death of Stalin despite the bid for improved relations on the part of the USSR.
  • The concept of peaceful coexistence and the motivations for this concept by Khrushchev and the Soviet leadership, and why the USA under Eisenhower and his Secretary of State, Dulles, and later Kennedy and his staff, responded in the way they did.
  • The importance of the Paris Summit, the U2 incident and the initial meetings of Kennedy and Khrushchev in Vienna.
  • The impact on the west of the crushing of the Hungarian rising and the continuing tensions over Berlin.
  • The impact on international relations of developments in weapons technology, including nuclear weapons development from the Soviet’s acquisition of fission technology in 1949, the explosion of the first hydrogen bomb in 1952 by the USA and the USSR’s gaining of H–bomb technology the following year.
  • The importance of delivery systems and the strides made by both powers in rocket science and the resulting ‘balance of terror’.
  • The importance of events such as the Cuban Missile Crisis and its’ resolution and the signing of the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty and the establishment of the ‘hot line’.
  • The relationship between the USSR and China and the impact of this on the USA’s relations with both countries.
  • The reasons for the signing of the Soviet–Chinese Treaty of Friendship, Alliance and Mutual Assistance in February 1950 and the consolidation of the relationship as a result of the outbreak of the Korean War and confrontation between China and the USA in this war and also Taiwan.
  • The deterioration in Soviet- Chinese relations from 1958 and the development of full-scale confrontation between the two by 1969
  • ‘Ping-pong’ diplomacy, which culminated in Nixon’s visit to China.
  • The period of improved relations, or détente between the USA and USSR during the 1970s
  • Why both the USA and the USSR wished to seek accommodation through the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty of 1972, the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty of the same year and the Helsinki Accords of 1975.
  • The critics of détente in both superpowers and the liberalisation in eastern Europe and the USSR.
  • The ‘economic realities’ refers to the increasing economic problems of the Soviet block in the 1970s and the economic resilience of the west.
  • The reasons for the breakdown of détente with the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the election of Thatcher Reagan.

You will use your knowledge of the period as a whole to provide a broad context but, in addition, you will need to develop detailed knowledge of the two issues selected as subjects of historical controversy for this unit;

The first controversy is the origins of the Cold War from the last year of the Second World War to Stalin’s death.

The second controversy is a study of the reasons for the sudden ending of the Cold War in the 1980s.

By the end of studying this unit you will be able to address these two controversies and apply what you have learned to aspects relating to these controversies.

Unit 4:  Historical Enquiry

Each candidate wishing to obtain an A level in History through the Edexcel examination board must complete a coursework option. Within restrictions students can choose their own area of study. Oxford College provides guidelines as to how this coursework can be completed using the following topic areas;

The Middle East and the Arab- Israeli Conflict, c1900-2001

Focus: The changing relationships between Jews and Arabs in the Middle East, and the reasons for continuing conflict.

  • Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1900-45.
  • The creation of the state of Israel and its impact.
  • Reasons for, and outcomes of, Arab-Israeli conflicts to 1973.
  • Arab nationalism in the 1980s and 1990s and divisions in the Arab world.

Ireland and the Union, 1815–1998

Focus: The changing demands for alterations to the constitutional relationship between Ireland and Great Britain and the developing divisions between Catholic and Protestant communities in this period.

  • The constitutional relationship between Britain and Ireland in the period to 1922.
  • The leadership and objectives of the Catholic and Protestant communities in the period to 1922.
  • The response of the British Government to pressure for change in Northern Ireland, 1922-98.
  • Reasons for continuing division between communities in Northern Ireland from the Partition to the 1990s

Full details of all the coursework options for this unit can be found on Edexcel website which can be accessed by the following external link: www.edexcel.com

There are 45 Edexcel approved and designed coursework programmes you should choose an option that is appropriate in consultation with your course tutor.

You do not need prior approval to use these options. However, some combinations are prohibited to ensure there is no overlap with Units 1, 2 and 3.

Prohibited combinations are made clear in the coursework pages of the specification, but if in doubt do ask your Oxford College tutor.

Students must select a period in consultation with their course tutor and the need to jointly develop a short introductory course or do some background reading that will provide an overview of the key issues of their chosen topic within a 100 year period.

Students must complete their coursework programme in two parts:

Part A involves the completion of an in-depth enquiry into the short-term significance of a key event, individual, development or movement within the period of their chosen study.

Part B requires the student to set their chosen event or individual in a broader context, exploring the process of change within a wider historical timeframe.

Oxford College History students must therefore be aware that the content of the coursework unit must not duplicate the content of the AS course (units 1 and 2). In this case, although Part B of the coursework may focus on the process of change over a whole extended period, Part A must not focus on content which has been studied at AS Level.

By the end of the AS Level you will have begun to successfully interpret and analyse historical sources. As well as learning about these very interesting historical periods, the principal focus of these units is to enable learners to be able to successfully handle the original sources and develop the skills of the historian.

The format of the Examinations

PLEASE NOTE: All exams will be held during the May – June exam period.

AS Units

Each unit is worth 50% of the total marks available for the AS GCE, and 25% for the A2 GCE if taken. The papers are each 90 minutes long and each carry 100 marks.

Unit 1

Written examination: 1 hour 20 minutes

Candidates will be required to answer two questions worth 30 marks each; these must be taken from different topics within the same option paper.
Unit 2

Written examination: 1 hour 20 minutes.

Within each option paper, candidates are required to answer two source-based questions for their chosen topic, question (a) and question (b).

The first question (a) is worth 20 marks and will focus on reaching a judgement by analysis, cross-referencing and evaluating source material.

The second question (b) is worth 40 marks and will ask candidates to address an historical view or claim using two sources in conjunction with their own knowledge. A choice of questions will be provided for each topic.

A2 Units

Unit 3

This exam is worth 60% of the total marks available for the A2 GCE.

Written examination: 2 hours.

Each option paper will be divided into Sections A and B. Candidates will be required to answer the following from their chosen topic:

One question in Section A out of a choice of two (30 marks). The essay questions will have an analytical focus that will require candidates to reach a substantiated judgement on a historical issue or problem

One question in Section B out of a choice of two (40 marks). The question will require candidates to compare the provided source material while exploring an issue of historical debate, and to reach substantiated judgements in the light of their own knowledge and understanding of the issues of interpretation and controversy.

Unit 4 (coursework) is worth 40% of the total marks available for the A2 GCE.

Assessment:

Part A: An extended essay which addresses the question that was posed as the focus of the enquiry. The enquiry must provide evidence of students’ ability to:

  • assess the significance of the chosen individual or event in the short term.
  • use secondary sources of information, and use and evaluate source material contemporary to the period.

Part B: An extended essay which addresses the question which was posed as the focus of the enquiry. The enquiry must provide evidence of students’ ability to:

  • identify relevant issues and make use of relevant reading and other data as appropriate in pursuit of the enquiry
  • assess the significance of the chosen factor or event in the long term (at least 100 years) by linking the chosen factor, individual or event with other events and force for change in the period.

Qualification

The titles of the qualifications as will appear on certificates are:

Edexcel GCE A Level History

Both AS and A2 level courses and examinations must be successfully completed to gain a full A level.

Specification:  Edexcel History (9HI01)

 

A Level Sociology

This course consists of four units:

  • Unit 1 – SCLY1: Culture and Identity; Families and Households; Wealth, Poverty and Welfare
  • Unit 2 – SCLY2: Education with Research Methods; Health with Research Methods
  • Unit 3 – SCLY3: Beliefs in Society; Global Development; Mass Media; Power and Politics
  • Unit 4 – SCLY4: Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods; Stratification and Differentiation with Theory and Methods

The study of Sociology is highly respected and this course will help you to;

  • To gain knowledge and understanding of theory and practice of sociology through direct study of case studies.
  • To encourage and develop an enthusiasm for sociology.
  • To give candidates the chance to form their own personal responses to issues relating to sociology its’ application.

The AS Units

Unit 1 – SCLY1: Culture and Identity; Families and Households; Wealth, Poverty and Welfare

In the study of this first unit, you will examine topic areas in relation to two core themes of sociology;

  • socialisation, culture and identity
  • social differentiation, power and stratification

In particular these themes will be used to explore;

Culture and Identity
In this part of the unit you will examine different conceptions of culture, including subculture, mass culture, high and low culture, popular culture and global culture. You will also consider the socialisation process and the role of the agencies of socialisation. You will explore different conceptions of the self and the relationship of identity to age, gender, ethnicity, social class and disability.

Families and Households
In this part of the unit you will examine the relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies, the changing patterns of cohabitation and marriage as well as the impact of separation, divorce, child‑bearing and the lifecourse, and the diversity of the contemporary family as well as household structures. You shall also explore the nature and extent of changes within the family and the nature of childhood  and changes in the status of children in the family and society. Finally, the unit will also introduce demographic trends in the UK since 1900 and the reasons for changes in birth rates, death rates and family size.

Wealth, Poverty and Welfare
In this part of the unit you will explore different definitions and ways of measuring poverty, wealth and income. You will consider the distribution of poverty, wealth and income between different social groups. The existence and persistence of poverty in contemporary society remains a key issue of concern today and in this section of the unit you will investigate different responses to poverty, with particular reference to the role of social policy since the 1940s. Finally, you will also consider the nature and role of public, private, voluntary and informal welfare provision in contemporary society.

Unit 2 – SCLY2: Education with Research Methods; Health with Research Methods

In this second unit you will continue to examine topic areas in relation to the two core themes of socialisation, culture and identity; and social differentiation, power and stratification.

In particular these themes will be used to explore;

Education
In this part of the unit you will examine the role and purpose of education, including vocational education and training, in contemporary society. You will learn about differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. You will consider the relationships and processes within schools, with particular reference to teacher/pupil relationships, pupil subcultures, the hidden curriculum, and the organisation of teaching and learning. This section of the unit will also consider the significance of educational policies, including selection, comprehensivisation and marketisation, for an understanding of the structure, role, impact and experience of education.

Health
In this part of the unit you will investigate issues relating to health, illness, disability as well as the body as social and as biological constructs. You will consider the unequal social distribution of health and illness in the United Kingdom by social class, age, gender, ethnicity and region, as well as internationally. Inequalities in the provision of, and access to, health care in contemporary society will also be considered and the sociological study of the nature and social distribution of mental illness will also be raised in this unit.

Sociological Methods
In this final part of the unit you will begin to consider and practice quantitative and qualitative methods of research; their strengths and limitations; research design, sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non‑participant observation, experiments, documents, and official statistics; the strengths and limitations of these sources.

The A2 Units

Unit 3 – SCLY3: Beliefs in Society; Global Development; Mass Media; Power and Politics

In this first unit of the A2 level of the qualification. You will be investigating and practicing skills of analysis and evaluation expected in relation to two of the topics covered in this unit;

  • Mass Media
  • Power and Politics

For each of these areas you will develop your knowledge, understanding as well as the skills of analysis and evaluation in relation to relevant theories, explanations and studies in each the topics studied.

Mass Media
In this section of the unit you will examine the relationship between ownership and control of the mass media. You will investigate the mass media, globalisation and popular culture as well as the processes of selection and presentation of the content of the news. You will consider the Media representations of age, social class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and disability as well as the relationship between the mass media, media content and presentation, and audiences. Finally you will consider the new media and their significance for an understanding of the role of the media in contemporary society.

Power and Politics
In this section of the unit you will examine the different theories of the nature and distribution of

Power and the role of the contemporary state. You will consider the nature of, and changes in, different forms of political participation, including voting behaviour, political action and protest, and membership of political organisations and movements. In addition you will explore the role of political parties, pressure/interest groups, new social movements and the mass media in the political process. Finally in this part of the unit you will consider the significance of globalisation for an understanding of power and politics in the contemporary world.

Unit 4 – SCLY4: Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods; Stratification and Differentiation with Theory and Methods

In this final unit of the course you will develop your skills in theoretical debate and participate actively in the research process. Throughout this final unit, you will be encouraged to use examples drawn from your own experience of small scale social research.

In your study of this unit, you should investigate the following two topic areas;

Crime and Deviance
In this part of the unit you will examine different theories of crime, deviance, social order and social control. You will explore the social distribution of crime and deviance by age, ethnicity, gender, locality and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime. You will consider Globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the mass media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes. You shall investigate aspects of crime control, prevention and punishment, victims, and the role of the criminal justice system and other agencies. You will also consider the sociological study of suicide and its theoretical and methodological implications. Finally you should make relevant connections between sociological theory and methods and the study of crime and deviance.

Stratification and Differentiation
In this part of the unit you will examine Different theories of stratification, including stratification by social class, gender, ethnicity and age. You will consider dimensions of inequality: class, status and power; differences in life-chances by social class, gender, ethnicity, age and disability, as well as the problems of defining and measuring social class; occupation, gender, and social class. You will investigate changes in structures of inequality, and the implications of these changes. The nature, extent and significance of patterns of social mobility and also the connections between sociological theory and methods and the study of stratification and differentiation.

By investigating one of these areas the unit will help you to develop an appreciation of the relationship between research, policy and practices in applying sociology in everyday life.

Sociological Research and Scientific Method
In this section you will be expected to extend your knowledge, understanding and skills of research design, data analysis, and data interpretation and reporting gained at AS Level and develop an understanding of the nature of science and scientific method.
Examination Board: AQA

Examination Codes:  AS Award 1191 & full A Level Award 2191.

By the end of the AS Level you will have begun to successfully investigate key areas of psychology theory and practice.  By the end of the full A level you will have also investigated several key topic areas in much greater detail and practised some of the research skill that are so necessary to success in the field of sociology.

The format of the Examinations

PLEASE NOTE: All exams will be held during the May – June exam period.

AS Units PYSA1 and PYSA2

Each unit is worth 50% of the total marks available for the AS GCE, and 25% for the A2 GCE if taken.

Unit 1 – SCLY1: Culture and Identity; Families and Households; Wealth, Poverty and Welfare

40% of AS, 20% of A Level
Written paper, 1 hour
60 marks

Candidates choose one topic from three and answer five questions.

Unit 2 – SCLY2: Education with Research Methods; Health with Research Methods

60% of AS, 30% of A Level
Written paper, 2 hours
90 marks

Candidates choose one topic (Education or Health) and answer four questions on the chosen topic, one question on sociological

A2 Units SCLY 3 and SCLY4

Each unit is worth 25% of the total marks available for the A2 GCE. The papers are between 90 minutes and 2 hours.

Unit 3 – SCLY3: Beliefs in Society; Global Development; Mass Media; Power and Politics

20% of A Level
Written paper, 1 hour 30 minutes
60 marks

Candidates choose one topic from four and answer two compulsory questions and one question from a choice of two.

Unit 4 – SCLY4: Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods; Stratification and Differentiation with Theory and Methods

30% of A Level
Written paper, 2 hours
90 marks

Candidates choose one topic from two and answer two questions on the chosen topic, one question on sociological research methods in context, and one question on theory and methods. The topics have been arranged for ease of understanding and topic coverage so may be of different length and difficulty. You will need to study them in sequence.

Qualification

The titles of the qualifications as will appear on certificates are:

AQA GCE A Level Sociology

Both AS and A2 level courses and examinations must be successfully completed to gain a full A level.

Specification:  AQA Sociology NASO (2190)

 

English DegreeAbout the Provider

Oxford Learning is a registered educational institution and is an independent, self-financing organization. Oxford Learning has developed quality, flexible and open distance learning materials for adults and continues to invest in the development of innovative learning systems, from first levels to degree and professional training programmes.

Oxford Learning works in conjunction with other institutions to bring the student the most comprehensive learning materials in order to support the student in fulfilling their academic aims.

Oxford Learning offers the student a flexible approach to learning which makes education possible for those who may otherwise not be able to complete a programme due to geographical restrictions and work or home-life commitments. It also benefits those who prefer to be in control of their studies. Please read the full course description and time-scales for each course.

All in one bundle only for

£850.00

 

English Literature

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