Fast Track A Level in Ancient History

Fast Track A Level in Ancient History

(Full AS+A2) H042 H442

The study of Ancient History is highly respected by Universities who look favourably on applicants who can demonstrate knowledge in this subject. In addition the Oxford College course in Ancient History will help you to; to gain knowledge and understanding of the ancient Greek and Roman

Fast Track A Level in Ancient Historyworld through direct study of the original sources. It will encourage and develop your enthusiasm for the Greek and Roman ancient world as well as give you the chance to form your own personal responses to the set texts chosen for study. It will help you to further and enhance your historical analytical and evaluative skills through critical source examination and understanding of good historical method.

Content

This course consists of four units:

  • AH1: Greek History through the original sources. Option 1: Athenian Democracy (Entry Code F391)
  • AH2: Roman History through the original sources. Option 3: Roman Britain (Entry Code F392)
  • AH3: Greek History: Culture and Conflict. The culture of Athens 449-399 BC (Entry Code F393)
  • AH4: Roman History: The use and abuse of power. Option 3: Ruling the Roman Empire (Entry Code F394)

The study of Ancient History is highly respected by Universities who look favourably on applicants who can demonstrate knowledge in this subject. In addition the Oxford College course in Ancient History will help you to;

  • To gain knowledge and understanding of the ancient Greek and Roman world through direct study of the original sources.
  • To encourage and develop an enthusiasm for the Greek and Roman ancient world.
  • To give candidates the chance to form their own personal responses to the set texts chosen for study.
  • To further and enhance their historical analytical and evaluative skills through critical source examination and understanding of good historical method.

AH1: Greek History through the original sources. Option 1: Athenian Democracy (Entry Code F391)

This unit examines why and how the city of Athens became a vibrant democracy during the 5th century BC. In this course you will explore the development of democracy and democratic institutions and the people that were behind this revolution. In this course you will study the development of the democracy at Athens through the actions of politicians and generals such as Cleisthenes, Pericles, Cimon and Nicias.

Ancient sources: In order to achieve success in this course, you will need to be able to access a number of Ancient sources including;

  • Aristotle’s Athenian Constitution (The Ath.Pol)
  • Aristophanes’ plays the Acharnians, the Knights and the Wasps
  • Herodotus’ Histories Plato’s, Apology
  • Plutarch’s Life of Nicias
  • ‘The Old Oligarch’
  • Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War

  • Xenophon’s Recollections  and History of Greece

All of these texts can be obtained from a variety of sources. Most bookshops stock a wide range of ancient source material and all of these ancient sources can be read in translation online for free online digital libraries such as Perseus Digital Library.

You can also obtain these sources in the recommended translations from Penguin publishers or LACTOR.

  • LACTOR II The Old Oligarch
  • LACTOR V Athenian Democracy

In studying Ancient Greek history through the original sources, you will develop your understanding the distinctive nature of ancient Athenian democracy, who participated and who was excluded as well as how the democracy was paid for.

You will also investigate the importance of the assembly of citizens (ekklesia) as well as the council (boule) that ran the day to day business of the city. You will also study the role and function of magistrates and generals as well as the peculiar institution of ostracism.

The courts were an essential part of democracy and jurors appointed from the citizen body held the power of life and death. The course will also discuss the importance of rhetoric and public speaking in Athenian society.

AH2: Roman History through the original sources. Option 3: Roman Britain (Entry Code F392)

This unit examines why and how the Romans came to control much of the British Isles. For four hundred years the province of Britain was part of the Roman Empire.  This course examines the first hundred years of this occupation.

In this course you will explore what Britain was like before the Romans invaded. You will examine why and how the Romans invaded and what opposition they faced as well as assistance given. You will investigate what reactions there were to Roman rule and why the Iceni Queen Boudicca attempted to destroy the Roman presence in Britain. The course will help you to investigate how the Romans benefited from the invasion as well as what the Romans gave back in return to the inhabitants of Britain.

Ancient sources: In order to achieve success in this course, you will need to be able to access a number of Ancient sources including;

  • Caesar’s Gallic War
  • Cicero’s Letters to Atticus
  • Horace’s Odes, 1.35.29–30, 3.5.1–4
  • Strabo’s Geography
  • Suetonius’ Lives of the Caesars
  • Tacitus, Agricola, Annals and Histories

You will also investigate archaeological evidence that tells us so much about the lives and society of Britain under the rule of the Romans

These sources (both literary and archaeological) are from the following LACTOR publications;

  • LACTOR IV Inscriptions of Roman Britain.
  • LACTOR XI Literary sources for Roman Britain.

In studying Ancient Roman history through the original sources, you will develop your understanding the distinctive nature of Roman Britain and why it was always seen as an unusual province by the Romans.

You will also investigate how the Romans viewed Britain and its’ inhabitants before and during the occupation period. The invasions of Caesar and the Emperor Claudius as well individuals such as Caratacus and Boudicca who resisted Roman rule as well as Cogidubnus and Cartimandua who welcomed Roman support.

The course also investigates the roles of Roman administrators and governors such as Agricola who led a long campaign of conquest into the north of the island and the occupation of a frontier zone that separated the island between those under Roman rule and those who were not.

Unit AH3 Culture and Conflict (Entry Code F393) Option 3: The culture of Athens 449-399 BC

This unit builds on the subject knowledge that you began to develop in AH1 Greek History through the original sources. Option 1: Athenian Democracy (F391)

This unit examines the culture and society of Athens in the later 5th century BC.

You will revisit the ancient sources that you studied at AS level as well as investigate new sources in greater detail. You will also develop your contextual knowledge of the period through the study of the ancient sources and use this contextual knowledge to prepare yourself for the A2 examinations.

This unit is a thematic one that examines the cultural and intellectual life of fifth century Athens and the materials will help you to prepare detailed responses to thematic questions including; the intellectual climate in Athens; the use of rhetoric by politicians and the role of the Sophists.

You will investigate dramatic festivals and the role and function of the theatre in Athenian society. The theatre fulfilled a religious as well as social function. The unit will also direct you to consider how the Athenian viewed themselves and the world around them citizens and Socrates is a key figure in the study of this period as is Aristophanes and these individuals and the ancient sources that deal with these individuals will be dealt with in depth.

Ancient sources: In order to achieve success in this course, you will need to be able to access a number of Ancient sources including;

  • Aristotle’s Athenian Constitution (The Ath.Pol)
  • Aristophanes’ plays
  • Herodotus’ Histories
  • Plato’s, Dialogues
  • Plutarch’s Life of Nicias, Pericles and Alcibiades
  • ‘The Old Oligarch’
  • Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War
  • Xenophon’s Recollections  and History of Greece

All of these texts can be obtained from a variety of sources. Most bookshops stock a wide range of ancient source material and all of these ancient sources can be read in translation online for free online digital libraries such as Perseus Digital Library.

The following LACTOR publications are extremely useful for this unit;

  • LACTOR I The Athenian Empire
  • LACTOR II The Old Oligarch
  • LACTOR V Athenian Democracy
  • LACTOR XII The Culture of Athens

You can also obtain these sources in the recommended translations from Penguin publishers or LACTOR.

Unit AH4 The Roman Empire, the use and abuse of power (Entry Code F394) Option 3: Ruling the Roman Empire 14-117 AD

This unit builds on the skills that candidates have acquired in AS Unit F392.

Like AH3 the focus of this option is thematic. You will examine the Roman Empire between the years 14AD-117AD; from the death of Augustus to the death of the Emperor Trajan. This unit will help you to consider the actions and policies of the Emperors and how these affected the running of the Roman Empire. You will develop a sound understanding of Rome’s relations with the various provinces of the empire; from Judaea to Britain and from Germany to Africa.

Across the range of these provinces and the reigns of the various Emperors you will consider the attitudes of the provincials to imperial rule; why did some provincials remain loyal and others sought to rebel? You will also consider what it was to be ‘Romanised’ and the various attitudes towards this trend.

The Emperors used various policies to keep their Empire united. One of these techniques was through the use of the imperial cult which was used to supplement the governance and administration of the Empire. How did the army help or hinder the smooth running of the Empire within the provinces? Finally you will examine how the old order of Romans; including the senators and equestrians were used to maintain and govern the Empire on behalf of the Emperor.

Ancient sources: In order to achieve success in this course, you will need to be able to access a number of Ancient sources including;

  • Pliny’s Natural History
  • Strabo’s Geography
  • Suetonius’ Lives of the Caesars
  • Tacitus, Agricola, Annals and Histories

You will also investigate archaeological evidence that tells us so much about the lives and society of the provincials under the rule of the Romans

The following LACTOR publications are extremely useful for this unit;

  • LACTOR IV Inscriptions of Roman Britain.
  • LACTOR VIII Inscriptions of the Roman Empire
  • LACTOR XI Literary sources for Roman Britain.
  • LACTOR XV Dio: The Julio-Claudians

All of these texts can be obtained from a variety of sources. Most bookshops stock a wide range of ancient source material and all of these ancient sources can be read in translation online for free online digital libraries such as Perseus Digital Library.

Examination Board: OCR

Examination Codes:  H042 H442

By the end of the AS Level you will have begun to successfully interpret and analyse the ancient historical sources. As well as learning about these very interesting historical periods, the principal focus of these units is to enable learners to be able to successfully handle the original sources and develop the skills of the historian.

The format of the Examinations

PLEASE NOTE: All exams will be held during the May – June exam period.

AS Units AH1 and AH2

Each unit is worth 50% of the total marks available for the AS GCE, and 25% for the A2 GCE if taken. The papers are each 90 minutes long and each carry 100 marks.

Unit AH1: Option 1 Greek history from original sources

Section A: commentary question (45 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of two, each question having three sub sections.

Section B: essay question (55 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of three. Bullet point guidance is given for each of the essay questions.

Unit AH2: Option 3 Roman history from original sources

Section A: commentary question (45 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of two, each question having three sub sections.

Section B: essay question (55 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of three. Bullet point guidance is given for each of the essay questions.

A2 Units AH3 and AH4

Each unit is worth 25% of the total marks available for the A2 GCE. The papers are each 2 hours and each carry 100 marks.

Unit AH3: Option 3 Greek history: conflict and culture

One section (100 marks). Candidates are required to answer two essay questions from a choice of four. The essay questions answered must both be from the same option. This unit is synoptic.

Unit AH4: Option 3 Roman History: the use and abuse of power

One section worth (100 marks). Candidates are required to answer two essay questions from a choice of four. The essay questions answered must both be from the same option. This unit is synoptic.

Qualification

The titles of the qualifications as will appear on certificates are:

OCR GCE A Level Ancient History

Both AS and A2 level courses and examinations must be successfully completed to gain a full A level.

Specification:  

OCR Ancient History NAAH

Course Fee

£365.00

Payment by Instalments

Students are able to pay course fees in monthly installments.

 

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